Portrait

Me In My Place ® - beautiful women at home

Real women in their own place.  Not too crazy and just a pinch of naughty…

By creating evocative and alluring portraits of women with body types that have traditionally been left out of mainstream media, Me In My Place is redefining a genre that has been over-run with unrealistic expectations of what it means to be beautiful.  With full acceptance of the “male gaze”, the images promote not just acceptance, but also an aspirational message about everyday appeal.  The project is a celebration and is meant to be fun and open to all.

In an effort to monetize the project to keep it going, we created a simple mobile web app, more commonly called THE MIMP APP (https://mimp.findrow.com).  This gave fans of the project a simple and inexpensive way to show support.  In exchange, they receive more images, exclusive images that are not on the tumblr, and the ability to quickly view and ‘like’ their favorite content.

The MIMP APP was such a success, we decided there must be other content providers like us who would like to give their fans something extra, so we created FINDROW.  With flexibility that Instagram and Facebook won’t allow, we give our content providers the freedom to express themselves as they see fit… even if that is not always safe for work ;-)  Again, they control their own content and are leading the conversation about how they feel beautiful in the world.  For a complete list of all the Findrow apps, click here.

Get ready for She’s Ryan bitches… because this chick wants it so bad she’s going to be the next fucking @Oprah.

image

Words by Sophie Saint Thomas (@TheBowieCat)

Images by Michael Edwards

Get ready for She’s Ryan bitches, because this chick wants it so bad she’s going to be the next fucking @Oprah. Except rather than Spanx and a cardigan she rocks a pink weave and leather tube tops. 

image

It’s 9:45PM on a Monday night. I’m squished in the backseat of a Jeep next to Michael Edwards, founder and photographer for Me In My Place, and Slimmy Neutron, founder and recording artist for Hello HVLO, (pronounced Hello Halo) a music production company and independent record label. We’re darting around cars on our way from their studio on West 30th Street to Cameo Gallery in Williamsburg. There’s a plastic cup of margarita flavored Four Loko in my hand. In the front seat sits @ShesRYAN with her own can of Four Loko, peach, her favorite. Slimmy prefers watermelon. Ryan is much smaller than the two men accompanying me in the backseat, but the honor of shotgun goes to her without debate.

imageimageimage

Ryan is supposed to take the stage at 9:50PM so we’re already running late, but she’s quite concerned about her boobs popping out of her leather tube top during her performance. “I need boobie tape, my tits are going to pop out!” Ryan screeches from the front seat. Her voice frequently rises from conversational tone to loud, uninhibited laughter. We stop at two different American Apparels under her orders, both closed. No boobie tape for Ryan. She knows they carry it, she used to manage an American Apparel store in Soho. “I’ve worked in retail everywhere,” Ryan told me back at the studio.  “Banana Republic, American Apparel, Betsey Johnson, G-Star, Macy’s. I’ve worked everywhere. I was a different person then. I was smoking a pack of Newport’s a day. I was skinny though!”

With her long pink hair and tattoos, dressed in booty shorts, a leather top and platform combat boots, it’s hard to imagine Ryan in a Banana Republic. She buys her Brazilian human hair extensions in bundles from a 6’7” hair dealer who delivers the hair to your door out of a backpack. It’s baby pink now, although she’s thinking of switching to hot pick, “nasty pink.” It’s certainly attention grabbing, she’s even been stopped at airport security to have her weave checked to make sure she’s not smuggling drugs in it.

image

The first time I saw Ryan was at Tammany Hall in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, at Hello HVLO’s Christmas party. I was there to see my friend Skip Rage perform, another rapper signed with HVLO, and was enjoying a beer waiting for the show to start. Rap performances start notoriously late. In retrospect, we would have had plenty of time to stop at a CVS and and buy some boobie tape, but it didn’t matter, to the crowd’s disappointment Ryan changed her top to one with straps and her breasts stayed put throughout the performance.

Back at the holiday party, before I even knew she was there to perform, I couldn’t take my eyes off her. It was a combination of attraction and intimidation, only partially credited to her appearance. 

imageimage

“I wear shorts and a tube top every single day. Who cares? I’m not a ho, I’m not a prostitute. Who says I got to be a ho because I don’t got a turtle neck on? I walk down the street confident and bold and I don’t get harassed. I don’t like to wear pants so I wear shorts, and if you try anything I will fucking roundhouse you. Own it. Own your style and individuality” 

Own it she does. Ryan admits her insistence on living in shorts presents a problem for attending weddings and funerals, but you get the feeling that even at such an event no one would give her a hard time. 

imageimage

An artist of many forms, it’s unclear if even she is certain what her main focus is, What is clear is that she craves success and has the determination and attitude to achieve it. Along with her music, Ryan frequently goes to open acting calls, and supports herself by freelance modeling. She’s also appeared in “basically in every tattoo magazine. Inked, Urban Ink, Skin & Ink, Rebel Ink. All the ones except fetish porn. The ones where you don’t have to shave your eyebrows off and can keep your clothes on. Or wear a latex mask.”

A believer in the law of attraction and the power of positive thinking, Ryan keeps a vision board. A vision board is a board filled with images or quotes meant to help you visualize and achieve your dreams, popular with performers. When asked about what was on her vision board, Ryan responded “Oprah. But Oprah may not be around because I feel like when I’m 56 I’m going to have my own Oprah show, I’m going to be Oprah.” Her vision also includes appearing in an Alexander Wang billboard on 42nd Street. “I swear to god I see my hair blowing and it’s not pink it’s like black and I look all morbid, you know how they look all skinny and shit.” 

imageimageimage

The black and white Alexander Wang billboards she’s referring to are so stylistically different than the colorful and exuberant girl I’m sitting across from that I briefly wonder if it’s simply fame rather than artistic expression she’s after. Not that there’s necessarily anything wrong with that, most successful female musicians comparable to Ryan are multiple threats dabbling in various forms of art, and if we’re honest with ourselves, most of us share the same hunger for success, even if we have to veer slightly off path to achieve it. Yet then as we near the end of the studio interview, and I step into the hall with Michael and Ryan as he takes photos of her, Ryan makes a comment seemingly unaware that I’m even paying attention that reassures me of her artistic realness: 

“I’m doing it because I love it. I don’t want to be the trendy bitch. In 10, 20 years I still want to be doing it.” 

image

Ryan was born in Flatbush, Brooklyn to two high school students. 

“My mom and had me when she was in high school. She went to Brooklyn Tech with my dad, they had me their junior year of high school. And basically they were really young so I had to live with my Grandmother for probably six or seven years, in not a good part of Brooklyn at all.” 

She then moved in with her mother, frequently relocating from small two bedroom apartments crowded with her three siblings and her stepfather. As a teenager she moved in with her father, a successful business man, where she had her own floor in his five-story Clinton Hill brownstone. “When I lived with my Dad it was like a different world. I’ve seen both sides of the spectrum that’s why I don’t judge people. Because I know what it feels like to have both.” 

image

She mentions the differences in her parents and their views on her career. Her father, the businessman, is often concerned about her ability to support herself financially while her mother applauds her artistic journey. 

“I think he’s from a different time because he doesn’t even get it. He was friends back in the day with Doug E. Fresh, so he’s like ‘Yeah, my boy he got dropped from his label.’ I’m like how would you tell me I am going to get dropped from my label, why would you say that to me? Doug E. Fresh, you can’t compare me to Doug E. Fresh!  And my mom she completely believes in me. She’s the hippie. She’s like, ‘I love to sing, you love to sing, keep singing!’ ” 

image

From the love and camaraderie felt among the HVLO crowd, there’s no sense of danger of Ryan being dropped from her label. She was hesitant to join the group at first, having negative experiences with other producers, but Slimmy hooked her. 

“Slimmy Neutron contacted me on Facebook. I used to put out little covers of myself singing and Slimmy ran across one, and was like, you have a great voice you should probably come to the studio and just check it out sometime. But at that time I was very scared because a lot of people would try to get me into the studio and it wouldn’t be productive. It would be me, sitting there, probably smoking, someone playing me a bunch of beats I really didn’t want to sing over, it wasn’t organic at all. And so it took Slimmy a while to get me here. When I finally got here he didn’t just play me a bunch of beats, he actually let me sing and let me write and constructed a beat around my voice. And that’s how “Bipolar” came about.”

image

If it’s her music that shoots Ryan to fame “Bipolar” will be the trigger. The jaw-dropping track alternates between Ryan beautifully crooning about her love for a man to fiercely screaming into the mic about how much she hates the same lover. It’s reminiscent of Kelis’s “Caught Out There”, an inspiration Ryan admits to, yet somehow (don’t hurt me Kelis) “Bipolar” captures the duality of emotions even more powerfully. 

“I hate to say that I feel like the crazy one at most times, because if you listen to the lyrics it’s like ‘I love you but now I hate your guts.’ And I just know that sometimes that’s how women are. And it’s fine, the song is letting girls everywhere know that its okay to feel crazy girl, because we all have felt crazy at one point. You ever been so in love that you can lay in bed with this person at night but then see him do one thing wrong and you want to rip his head off his shoulders? So that’s what the song is saying, I love you but I hate you.” 

HVLO isn’t quite ready to unleash the song on the world. In fact, Ryan doesn’t even have an album or video out for the track yet. 

image

“It’s so epic and it’s put together so well that we don’t’ just want to throw it out and do a quick video for it. We need like time and money. So what we’re going to do is put out different songs and lead up to it and build the buzz more. So this way when “Bipolar” does finally release it’s going to be huge. Kelis probably will hear it, you know what I’m saying?”

It’s almost 11PM before Ryan appears on stage at Cameo Gallery. Ryan’s got the looks, the talent, and the attitude, yet somewhere buried in her must lie the seed of doubt: Will I make it? As an observer, I’m wondering myself as I look around the sparse crowd, in one of countless small music venues in New York. Ryan is an artist who doesn’t have an album out, yet alone a video, in a city teeming with artists trying to make it, some with better connections, more money, more exposure. 

imageimage

And then Ryan hits the stage. After a few songs to get the crowd amped, “Bipolar” begins. She opens the track by announcing it’s her favorite song and singing the chorus acapella, and then the track kicks on and she’s tearing off her jacket and writhing on the floor and her entire energy encompasses the room. Slimmy told me that after every one of Ryan’s performance, someone ends up booking her for another show. As a converted fan, I’ll take a page from Ryan’s book and use the power of positive thinking to hope that one day the right person is there to see her, as a vision board can only get you so far.

image

Before she goes on I ask her if she is nervous. “Hell to the no. I’m just going to go in there and rock the fuck out, probably with a Four Loko in my hand. I’m so fucking exhilarated, no nerves. That’s how I know I was meant to do this.” 

Until HVLO is ready to release “Bipolar” you can listen to She’s Ryan’s “Painted Picture” here

image

(Source: app.meinmyplace.com)

comments powered by Disqus

Notes

  1. madamegribblepropanegoddess reblogged this from meinmyplace
  2. picturecompany reblogged this from meinmyplace
  3. tabbran reblogged this from meandmyopinion and added:
    She’s Ryan, motherfuckers. ON THAT WAVE.
  4. meandmyopinion reblogged this from meinmyplace
  5. hollywoodbarbiee reblogged this from meinmyplace
  6. thebowiecat reblogged this from meinmyplace
  7. tooonchiblog reblogged this from meinmyplace
  8. lexurism reblogged this from tellmewherethisis
  9. tellmewherethisis reblogged this from meinmyplace
  10. theforgottensforever reblogged this from meinmyplace
  11. meinmyplace posted this